Tcher’s Cut: Making the Invisible Visible

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I’ve long been curious about what’s underneath. The back story of the author, the inspiration for the music, the influences that created the athlete. It’s not just the history or the origin story I’m interested in, it’s the story wrapped inside the story that grabs my attention and makes me want to keep uncovering. And I know I’m not the only one because so many of you reach out to me, stop me at a conference, or after a workshop, and ask for all the details. Did you really mess up that lesson or did you plan to? How do you grade all of that writing? Did your students only do that stuff for the camera? How do you come up with your ideas? What happens next?

For as long as I’ve been making videos with Teaching Channel, I’ve had this idea that there should be a version where I get to pull back the curtain and tell the story behind the story. Even though our medium is video and everything seems visible, it’s not. There’s so much invisible work in teaching: the ideation, the planning, the “fake left and go right,” the careful attention and revision. With this in mind, we’re launching our new series, Tcher’s Cut, to give you an insider’s look at all that invisible work, to help answer the questions you’re prompted to ask.

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PodcastPodcastWomen Leaders in Education: Kristen Swanson

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Sitting down to talk with Kristin felt like talking with a friend.

Kristen Swanson, founder of EdCamp and current Director of Learning at Slack, brings to the table an accomplished career in education and leadership, but during our interview, I was most in awe of her humility and down to earth nature.

It was incredibly clear that, in her life, she listens, connects, and elevates the ideas of others. These qualities are all components that likely enabled her to create the EdCamp platform. For readers not familiar, EdCamp is an “unconference” where participants drive the content, structure, and flow of their professional development on the day of the event. EdCamp provides ownership of ideas, participant voice, internal motivation, and relevance to teachers seeking to redefine their professional learning experiences.

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Calling All Bloggers: Submit Your New Teacher Blog Idea!

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What if I told you there’s a new teacher out there struggling who needs you — would you share your story?

I remember my first year like it was yesterday. I accepted an interview for a permanent position on September 30th. I thought this was strange timing, given the new school year had just begun; however, to me, it was also serendipitous.

There was no question in my mind that I would take the chance to sit for an interview and teach a lesson to what would become my first class of students.

I was so excited to learn I would have a real job, I hardly took the time to wonder why several teachers left this position in the short month since the school opened its doors, or what it meant when a series of administrators and faculty characterized the group of sweet, cooperative adolescents I met as “challenging.” In fact, it didn’t even phase me that, after announcing what my new salary would be, my then-superintendent asked, “So, do you still want the job?”

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[ARCHIVE] #TchLIVE: The Art of Engineering Practices and Creative Design

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Thank you to everyone who joined us as we discussed The Art of Engineering Practices and Creative Design in the K-12 Learning Space.

We discovered a lot of overlap between STEM, the arts, and design. In fact, engineers often use design to think outside the box, accomplish a task, or solve a problem.

Continue to think about ways STEM and the arts are complimentary and seek opportunities to collaborate with colleagues who can bring a different perspective to the conversation.

Don’t forget to check out our Storify below, because it’s jam packed with resources and ideas you can use in your classroom right now. If you have questions, reach out. And remember to follow the Tchers you connected with in the chat, so we can continue the conversation and get better together!

#TchLIVE Reminder

Want timely reminders about #TchLIVE chats on Twitter? Sign up for our Remind class: remind.com/join/tchlive.

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Tch Video Lounge 2.0: Reboot Your Professional Learning

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Tch Video Lounge 2.0 is open for business.

Last year, we opened the doors to Tch Video Lounge, a place where the Teaching Channel community can watch and discuss videos with each other. This past fall, due to the closing down of the player we were using, we unfortunately had to temporarily close the doors to the lounge. Now there’s great news! Thanks to our friends at PlayPosit, the lounge doors are swinging back open.

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Video Self-Reflection: A Close Read of My Classroom

Tch Next Gen Science Squad

A teacher can learn a lot by taking a close read of the classroom.

However, the pace of a typical school day doesn’t allow for much time to step back and take it all in. That’s why video is a great tool to help teachers understand what’s really happening in the classroom as students engage in learning activities.

In the videos I collected of students, I began to notice there was a pattern to their conversations. Based upon the task at hand, my role was to be a facilitator. As teachers embark into NGSS territory, it will become more obvious that students are highly engaged in their tasks. They’re excited and need help making sense of their thinking.

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Video Playlist: Argumentation in Mathematics

Mathematical Argumentation - Watch the video series

When you hear the word argument, you might think of a heated dispute or a clashing of opposing sides. In the mathematics classroom, however, the practice of argumentation involves making claims, supporting them with evidence, evaluating the reasoning of others, and making sense of mathematical ideas. This mathematical practice is identified by the Common Core Standards as central to the work of K-12 mathematics. It’s the practice through which a mathematical community determines what will be accepted as true.

While students in the upper grades may engage in more formal argumentation and deductive proof, young children can and do engage in supporting their reasoning with evidence, making sense of the arguments of their peers, and making conjectures about mathematical relationships. For example, students might argue that 5+3 is the same thing as 3+5 by modeling both expressions using unifix cubes.

Or students might move toward making more general statements about how and under what conditions a mathematical relationship is true. For young students, this might sound like, “It doesn’t matter what order you add the numbers in, you will always get the same amount.” This is related to, and perhaps builds on the claim above, but implies this relationship will be true for any number.

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PodcastPodcastWomen Leaders in Education: Linda Darling-Hammond

Women Leaders In Education

Our new series, Women Leaders in Education, shares powerful narratives from female trailblazers in education. Our first interview is with Linda Darling-Hammond. An educational leader focused on bridging education and policy, Linda Darling-Hammond is an advocate, author, reformer, professor, and policymaker. She has been instrumental in shaping many areas within the education ecosystem, including teaching standards, assessments, educational systems, and education policy. Teachers across the nation continue to be inspired and encouraged by her powerful and thoughtful messages.
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From Traditional Conclusions to Claims, Evidence, and Reasoning

Tch Next Gen Science Squad

Constructing Explanations and Engaging in Argument from Evidence are two Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) practices I have heavily emphasized in my classroom over the past few years. My immersion in NGSS professional development that focuses on these practices has allowed me to develop new ways to engage my students and assess their abilities.

I teach seventh grade in a selective enrollment school in Chicago. When I first started teaching, I used a traditional lab report rubric (Figure 1) to help scaffold the conclusion writing of my students. The rubric focused on the skills we had started at the beginning of the year, collecting and analyzing quantitative and qualitative data, explaining data, and reflecting on the work done in the lab.

traditional lab report rubric

Figure 1

In the beginning, some students had difficulty explaining their data; they could only state some numbers or a qualitative change they had seen. As I reflected on their data, I realized they were providing me with a lab analysis that was still very surface level. The assessment structure I used also restricted the explanations they were making to lab reports, which happened only a few times per semester.

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