Got Questions? Ask the Tch Community!

New Resource for Busy Teachers

Confession time: I think I’m developing an addiction to Q&A. With this new tool on TeachingChannel.org, you can type up a quick question and send it out to the Tch community. If other teachers have answers, they can fire off a response. Almost every time I sit down at my computer to work, I find myself drifting over to the Q&A page to see teachers connecting and learning from each other.

Q&AOne of the reasons I’m so excited about Q&A is that it highlights how fabulous the Tch community is. From the comments you leave on videos to the insightful feedback you give us on the site, it’s always been clear that you have your thinking caps on. Q&A helps to bring teachers together, pooling our resources and answering each other’s questions quickly and easily.

For teachers, there’s never enough time in the day. We all know that. There are endless resources to try and there are always ways in which we hope to improve. We also know that there are amazing fellow teachers, but they’re probably really busy too. Read more

Let’s Chat Core: Simplifying Text Complexity

A Teacher’s “Working Definition”

As I meet and talk to teachers about the Common Core State Standards, I consistently hear the question: “What is all this text complexity? Am I supposed to be giving kids harder things to read?” This question underscores some of the truth and a lot of the misconceptions about text complexity, its role as part of the Core and how it functions in the classroom.

Let’s Chat Core

New Look and an Exciting New Feature on Tch

We’re starting the New Year at Teaching Channel with a new look, and a new feature we’re very excited to share with the Tch community.

As part of our new look, we’ve also moved a few things around—so I want to make sure you know where to find your favorite features.

My Workspace and teacher videos

Looking for the video page and video filters? Just click the “Video” link at the top of the page and you’re there.

Need to get to your Workspace? Click the link just above the search button at the top of the page.

Now check out the new Q & A section. This is something we believe will take our community’s ability to learn from each other to a whole new level. Our goal is to enable you to tap into the collective wisdom of the entire Tch community with a few simple clicks.

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When A Lesson Goes All Wrong

Making Mistakes: The Best Way to Grow

Sarah Brown Wessling is a high school English teacher in Johnston, Iowa. She is the 2010 National Teacher of the Year and is the Teacher Laureate for Teaching Channel. She also hosts “Teaching Channel Presents” on public television stations around the country. Connect with Sarah on Twitter – @SarahWessling.

I’m afraid of mediocrity. That too-comfortable place where repetition and apprehension meet. In an effort to combat the commonplace, I decided long ago to not be afraid of my mistakes. Rather than trying to cover them up or excuse them away, I’ve always faced them head-on with a desire to learn and become better as a result.

Recently, when Teaching Channel was filming in our classroom, the film crew was joking with me: “We haven’t had a bad lesson yet, Sarah. We better knock on wood.” Of course, I’d had days when lessons didn’t go quite right, but just not when the cameras were there.

Then It Happened

Be Sure To: Setting & Achieving Goals in 2013

What Goals Are You Setting for the New Year?

Happy New Year! I hope you all enjoyed a wonderful and relaxing holiday break. With the New Year comes a chance to set intentions and make changes. But before we decide on New Year’s resolutions, it can be helpful to take a moment to reflect. What exactly would be the most helpful thing to work on in 2013?

There may be many changes you’d like to make: maybe you’d like to start using a new math curriculum, send home a weekly newsletter, revamp your reading program, send home differentiated homework packets, rearrange the tables in your classroom… your wish list probably goes on and on. But you can’t do everything, at least not all at once.

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