Let’s Chat Core: Simplifying Text Complexity

A Teacher’s “Working Definition”

As I meet and talk to teachers about the Common Core State Standards, I consistently hear the question: “What is all this text complexity? Am I supposed to be giving kids harder things to read?” This question underscores some of the truth and a lot of the misconceptions about text complexity, its role as part of the Core and how it functions in the classroom.

Common Core Video Webinar

Text complexity isn’t simple. But, we can simplify it to help us meet the needs of our learners. That’s the goal of this webinar, to demystify what that “text complexity” is all about and explore the ways we can use it is to make purposeful decisions about what we’re asking our students to read.

And remember, text complexity business isn’t just for English Language Arts teachers, it’s for all of us who put primary texts in front of our students, knowing that the more they delve into the language of our disciplines, the more equipped they will be to think.

In this new video webinar, I’m offering a teacher’s “working definition” of text complexity, break down its three parts and offer some strategies for using this framework purposefully in the classroom.

Let’s Chat Core: Simplifying Text Complexity

Next time, I’m going to offer strategies for sifting through all the CCSS resources that are out there.

And, if you’re just jumping into our Let’s Chat Core series, here are all the previous blogs and videos.

Learning to Read the Core

Implementing the Core: Where to Begin?

Core Changes and Their Impact

Unpacking the Standards

A Go to Toolbox for Teachers

Let’s Chat Core is an ongoing Teaching Channel series designed to help educators understand and implement the Common Core State Standards. Sarah Brown Wessling is a high school English teacher in Johnston, Iowa. She is the 2010 National Teacher of the Year and is the Teacher Laureate for Teaching Channel. Connect with Sarah on Twitter - @SarahWessling.

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