Summer Reading and Resource List: Get a Head Start on Planning with these 8 Science Recommendations

With the school year coming to a close, it’s time to start making your summer plans! Sure, you probably have plans to head to the beach, travel, and partake in TONS  of outdoor activities–especially after the winter we’ve had to endure, here, in Chiberia!

Of course, you’ll also set aside time to do some reading and think about your how you’d like to run your classroom during the next school year….right?? We wanted to send you off on summer break armed with the best readings and resources to help you get a head start on your planning.

Check out these 8 awesome, free, and teacher-approved resources (click on the links in red)…

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Video Playlist: Your Favorite Clips of 2013-2014

Our final video playlist for this school year features the five most-viewed videos out of the 42 that we created for TchAUSL this school year. In no particular order, I present to you Your Favorite Clips:

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First Two Weeks at a New Turnaround School

Chalmers School of Excellence science teacher Cherita Srirama opened up her classroom and her practice in this clip from September 2013. Cherita shares what she learned in those first months in a new turnaround in this Behind the Teaching clip.

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DIY #7 Top Ten Coach Approved Ways to Get Smarter over the Summer

It’s that time of the year again!  You know the time of year when you’re answer to the question, “When does school get out?” is a very detailed, “25 days, 6 hours, 13 minutes and 46 seconds.”coachapproved-angled

Summer can’t get here fast enough and we know why, too:

  • You want to dust off the stack of professional books on your nightstand and read them without falling asleep
  • You want to visit the Chicago museums and plan a purpose-driven field trip for your class
  • You want to finally read some of the young adult fiction from your classroom library so you can start recommending more than that one Walter Dean Meyers’ book to your students
  • You want to bring one of the multi-step math word problems you taught your students to a party and watch your friends struggle to solve it.

Well, we have the right list of resources for you today: Here is an AUSL Coach approved list of the top ten ways you can get smarter over the summer!

1. Stock Up on Classroom Books

Get a group and a van and head out to the next Scholastic Customer Appreciation Warehouse sales and score books at prices up to 80% off.  Or head over to one of the coolest bookstores in Chicago called Open Books.  It has books but it offers so much more!

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Special EDition: Who’s Who in the CTR’s SPE Resident Cohort?

AUSL’s Chicago Teacher Residency (CTR) program is about to witness its first class of graduates in Special Education.  This small but mighty cohort of 11 residents will be the first to receive a master’s degree in Special Education and be fully endorsed as Learning Behavior Specialists.  All of these residents have spent the past nine months observing, planning, teaching, and learning alongside a mentor teacher and coach in an elementary Special Education classroom in one of AUSL’s training academies.

So on the heels of Teacher Appreciation Week, I thought it was fitting to feature this group of future AUSL Special Educators and get to know them a little better as we explore Who’s Who…

Back Row: Brittany Anderson, Christine Roche, John Devine, Celia Davenport, Shannon Conroy, Nathan Rosiejka. Front Row: Agata Sidorkiewicz Jean Wilkinson, Jessica Kimbrough, Sally Tabatsalis, Chris Roeloffs.

Top Row: Brittany Anderson, Christine Roche, John Devine, Celia Davenport, Shannon Conroy, Nathan Rosiejka. Bottom Row: Agata Sidorkiewicz, Jean Wilkinson, Jessica Kimbrough, Sally Tabatsalis, Chris Roeloffs.

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Five Reasons Why I (Still) Love the Common Core… and You Should Too

Louis CK

Comedian Louis C.K. shared this tongue-in-cheek example of a CCSS-aligned math problem on Letterman late last week:

“Bill has three goldfish.  He buys two more.  How many dogs live in London?”

This (pretend) problem was meant to illustrate his many gripes about the Core.  His kids’ math homework seems too difficult, bordering on ridiculous.  Earlier that week he tweeted pictures of his kids’ homework assignments, which asked them to do things like draw pictures of what the problem was asking rather than get down to business of adding and subtracting.  He has noticed the pressure around standardized testing ratchet up over the past couple years, and blames the CCSS for the shift.

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