Crafting Deeper Collaboration: An Invitation

Regardless of context, we’d all likely agree that facilitating student collaboration isn’t an easy task. And if we’re being fully transparent, we can confess that sometimes it’s downright painful! Somewhere along the secondary grades, we tend to lose sight of explicitly teaching students skills such as collaboration, and rather expect students to simply be able to successfully work in a group together.

With limited time, support, and resources available to develop our craft in regards to student collaboration, it’s easy to focus on other demands and hope that students will organically develop these skills. If this resonatescollaboration for deeper learning with you and sounds like something you need support with, I’d like to invite you to sign up for one of the 50 open seats in a new learning experience starting on November 10th, with an online launch at noon Pacific/3 PM Eastern. Over five weeks, we’ll work together to try strategies for increasing student collaboration in the classroom, concluding our journey on December 15th.
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Animating The Classroom

TED youth Brooklyn museum November 2015

TEDYouth conference at the Brooklyn Museum. November, 2015. Photo by Ryan Lash for TED via Flickr

It was outstanding. Under the soft glow of the mighty brass chandeliers of the Beaux Arts Court of the Brooklyn Museum, learning stations — many decorated with a splash of iconic TED red — were scattered about the restored glass tile floor like a handful of strategically tossed jacks. As I bounced about the room, I watched 400 students smile with delight, scrambling to engage, create, and collect the vast knowledge available in the room. They vibrated with energy and I knew in an instant that this conference would be extraordinary.

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Design Thinking, Empathy, and Equity – Part 2

Author’s note: This is a continuation of my post Design Thinking, Empathy, and Equity, that was published earlier this year. It feels particularly timely to share after the racially divisive and violent events that marked this past month.

I have no doubt that our students will return to our classrooms in August with questions we’re afraid or unsure how to answer, and possibly with fear and frustration. I want to offer up the following as one possibility for how we can move our collective equity work forward. Building empathy in our students is a beginning step toward the creation of a more loving society, and perhaps design thinking can get us there.

When engaged with fidelity, the design thinking process is a rigorous one that truly engages students in deeper learning. If we’re grounding this work in equity, the process shouldn’t be rushed. In fact, the seemingly fluid process of design thinking should include pauses. Such pauses should take place after students have started building their empathy muscles, and are approaching the stages of prototyping and testing.

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Ego vs. Vulnerability in the Classroom Arena

The Big Tent

The Upcycling DiariesEditor’s Note: This blog is the third post by Jennifer in the Upcycling Series about heading back to the classroom after time as an instructional coach. Join us in following her journey.

In the arena of education, I’ve learned to pay attention to how I grasp and assimilate new concepts. I pride myself on the idea that I’m a natural at applying insights to my own teaching practice. And there it is… my irrepressible ego. That’s my ego infiltrating and creeping up at the beginning of my blog. Always on alert. Always convinced that “I got this.” Always self preserving with an insatiable appetite.

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Design Thinking, Empathy, And Equity

I honor and admire Design Thinking for many reasons — its ingenuity, how engaging and rigorous it can be for students, and ultimately that it serves as a vehicle for Deeper Learning. But mostly I value Design Thinking because it gives me hope — hope in the power and potential that it holds for our students as human beings. Design Thinking has the unique power to leverage the intersection of equity and innovation through deeper learning and empathy.

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Lodestar: A School Built Around Agency

Making in Schools

This is the fourth in a six-part series titled Making in Schools.

Since the dawn of the industrial revolution, roughly 125 years ago, American schools have looked roughly the same. At its heart, our system has been driven by two organizing principles:

  1. Students should be organized into classes by age and subject.
  2. Content should be delivered in a standardized order and at a standardized pace.

While this system may have been functional in preparing students to work in steel factories or cotton mills, ensuring that each graduate of the system had similar skills/knowledge and were used to working according to a standardized, regimented schedule, it’s not holding up to the demands of today.

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Sarah’s Summer Road Trip (Week 3): Project-Based Learning for All

Sarah's Summer Road Trip

Our last road trip stop in Tampa, Florida, helped us reconnect with the importance of giving students all kinds of space for learning: verbal space to drive discussions, cognitive space to design questions for learning, and physical space to foster collaboration.

With our sense of space broadened, let’s make our way to Flushing International High School in New York, where we’ll meet teacher Jordan Wolf. He’s going to give us some incredible insight about working with English Language Learners. Onward!

You’re invited to join us as we take another special Zaption tour, this time in Jordan’s classroom. We’ll learn more about the ways he meets students where they are in order to build deeper learning experiences. Don’t forget, when you participate in the Zaption tour, you also have the chance to discuss it with teachers from around the country who are road tripping with us!

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Jordan Wolf: From Subway to Student-Learning Advocate

Sarah's Summer Road Trip

This interview with Jordan Wolf is part of Sarah’s Summer Road Trip: Uncovering the Secrets of Great Teaching. Engage with the Zaption tour of Jordan’s classroom and ride along on the road trip!

Like many teachers, Jordan Wolf’s path to the classroom was more happenstance than planned. Also, like many teachers, Jordan Wolf knew immediately he had found his passion.

As an environmental consultant, just out of college, Jordan recognized that his love for science and research was being overwhelmed by the politics of his consultancy work. Then, one auspicious day on the New York City subway, he read an advertisement from the NYC Teaching Fellows offering an alternative credentialing system to become a teacher. He signed up, was accepted, went through an intensive two-month initiation program, and started student teaching while finishing his coursework.

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Five Fest Takeaways

What an incredible group of educators. I’m so fortunate to have engaged with individuals and organizations deeply committed to supporting teachers honing their craft. For those of you that were unable to attend our Berkeley TeamsFest, you were missed, and to keep you in the “tent,” here are my five Fest takeaways. Festies, share more of your takeaways with our Teams community in the comments.   Read more

May Fest 2015: Deep Learning Storified!

Teams Fest took over the Berkeley marina last week for a deeper look at what it means to get better together under the big tent. The two problems or puzzles of practice that were explored included:

  • How do we engineer deep learning experiences so that Teams is the spot where teachers, coaches, principals, district leaders, professors and researchers find their professional fuel?
  • How is our profession growing as a result of our work? How are we shaping the national conversation about what it means to be a a teacher? A leader?

The two days were full of camaraderie, collegial conversations, deep engagement with Teams and of course, fun!

 

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