How Many Days Are Left? 10 Tips to End the Year with Positivity and Purpose

Tchers' Voice Great ideas from passionate educators just like you

Inevitably, when educators get to April or May, the question of “How many days are left?” is uttered frequently, and with so many different variations in tone.

There is the Freaked Out — pure panic because “I still have so much material left to cover,” or “My kids are not ready for the AP test.”

Or the Exhausted, when this question is quietly mumbled with a tone of “I cannot do it; I won’t make it that long.

Don’t forget about the Angered, whereby one basically screams the question, with the certainty that the answer will be an unreasonable number.

At times, you might even get the Practical. This one is probably heard the least, but typically involves the initial question asked in a reflective tone and followed by a concrete plan to make it through.

And if you’re lucky, you might just get the To Hell With It. A personal favorite, this educator might not even finish asking the question because he or she has just reached a point where they don’t even care anymore. It’s not that they don’t care about their job or their students, but they just don’t care, for better or worse, how many days are left.

The educational reality is that we’ve reached the time of year when you probably can see yourself in one (or more, depending on the day) of these responses. And if the weather where you are is at all like it is in Chicago this “spring,” there are probably days when you don’t even have the disposition to ask the question, because you’re so annoyed by it all.

While I’m no psychological expert and certainly don’t have all the answers, I’d like to present to you ten things you can do to help make it through the rest of the year, bad weather and all, with positivity and purpose.

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Doing Poorly on Purpose: Why Smart Kids Choose Not to do Well in School

doing poorly on purpose

As a teacher myself, I feel your pain when a capable student chooses — yes, chooses — not to perform well academically. Cajole as we might (and do…) to convince kids like these on the merits of academic accomplishment, many of them look at us with that blank expression of adolescence that speaks volumes in its silence.

What they don’t say are things like these:

  • “School is irrelevant to what I’ll eventually do in life, and we both know it. Tell me how linear algebra will help me become a better attorney.”
  • “If you really cared to help me, you’d let me test out of what I know how to do so that I had time to pursue stuff that is important to me.”
  • “The reason I don’t do the homework is that I’ve already proven to you through my class performance that I understand this stuff. Wouldn’t you be as frustrated as I am if you had to do such meaningless work every night?”

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More times than not, smart students who choose to do poorly on purpose have very good reasons for being disillusioned with their middle and high school experiences. And these students may be on to something. Research on gifted students and other high achievers has shown that many of them know 50% or more of the grade-level curriculum before it’s “taught” to them.

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#TchStressAway: Is Stress Really The Enemy?

Last month, I made a concerted effort to think about managing stress through a series of challenges called #TchStressAway.

As I engaged in each of the challenges, and extended them to the 200 teachers that joined my journey, I became mindful of my own reactions to stress. I’ve since decided that stress is inevitable. An overachiever my entire life, I constantly stack too much on my plate, and I imagine this will most likely continue. In fact, I’m beginning to realize that I seem to seek out stressful situations. I take on responsibilities even when encouraged not to. I create “to-do” lists that I know I won’t be able to finish. And I dream up new ideas to explore, even where there’s no reason to do so. Most of this is simply innate to me as an individual, so it’s an aspect of my life I want to manage but not necessarily get rid of.

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#TchStressAway: Finding Balance Together

Tch Laureate Team

This is part of Crystal Morey’s Getting Better Together work. Crystal and all the Teaching Channel Laureates are going public with their practice and seeking support in getting better from colleagues and the Tch community.

I wrote this while enjoying my two-week winter vacation. Completing lists of neglected chores and appointments, I felt as though I would get back to equilibrium by the time school resumed. What I discovered, though, is that as much as I tried to recharge, I simply drained my battery too much this past fall.

Getting Better TogetherLike a car whose lights were left on inadvertently, I too needed a jump start. This got me thinking. With the tremendous pressures and critiques we as teachers endure on a daily basis, what are we doing to regain balance?

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Hello. It’s Us.

It’s been said we tend to write the same story over and over. So here I go again. After a vacation of balanced living including time in the mainstream culture, here’s my heartfelt New Years take on the culture of our profession, the role colleagues play in our effectiveness, and our love of the job.

Idea #1: The Power to Tip

I reread Malcolm Gladwell’s The Tipping Point to ruminate on what he refers to as the “magic moment” when “an idea or social behavior tips and spreads like wildfire.”

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5 Tips To Stay Rejuvenated in the New Year

For many people, the end of the holidays and the beginning of a new year is a time for reflection, setting new goals, and perhaps finally using the gym membership they signed up for a year ago.

Teachers, however, are not most people. Our “new year” actually begins in September, when we return to our classrooms once again to find our furniture flipped upside down and stacked in the corner of the room. We set new goals, reorganize the classroom library, and yes, wipe down every single tabletop surface with disinfectant, several times.

So what does a new calendar year mean for the teacher in you? How are you marking the end of 2017 and the beginning of 2018?

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#TchLIVE: All The Way To The Finish Line! Maintaining Strong Classroom Culture

Building classroom culture is something we tend to think a lot about at the beginning of the year, but it’s just as important to maintain and nurture it throughout the year. For this month’s chat, we want to talk about how you set up your classroom culture, how you maintain the things that are working, and how you change the things that don’t.

This #TchLIVE chat will be on Thursday, March 26th at 4pm PDT.

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Compassionate Coaching: Support and Encouragement Go a Long Way

Teaching is an intellectual, cognitively challenging job. It’s an emotional one, too. The myriad emotions that come with being a teacher is a real part of the profession. According to this article by the New Teacher Center, first year teachers have an even more intensified emotional experience and this chart from the article outlines the roller coaster of emotions that come up during a teacher’s first year like this:

phases of 1st year teachers

Image from New Teacher Center

When I first saw the chart, I found it enlightening and used it as a tool to help me understand where my teachers were coming from. And I recognized that even with years of experience under my belt, I sometimes experienced the same rollercoaster of feelings. I’ve come to discover that offering emotional support is as important as offering instructional support.

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Boosting Your Practice: Anytime is a Good Time With These 12 Tips

Now that we’re getting back into the groove of the classroom, it can be a good opportunity to try some new things, improve on the old, and reignite your classroom vision. With help from Instructional Coach Katie Lyons, I’ve come up with a list of quick adjustments to your practice that will have big payoffs:

1. Revamp classroom management: Do you have some classroom management loose ends? Take some time to hash out those situations with your students and revisit classroom expectations. Together with the students, form new expectations if necessary, and the consequences for not meeting them.

2. Get organized: Are ungraded papers cluttering your desk? Create an organization system that is easy to manage. If you don’t have them already, create a file folder for each student. Have three baskets available on your desk for papers returned, papers that need to be graded, and papers that need to be filed.

Boost Your Practice