Three Ways to Use Virtual Science Notebooks in the Early Grades

Tch Next Gen Science Squad

This is the first year that I’ve been using virtual notebooks in my classroom. At first, I was a bit nervous about trying this with six-year-olds, but I felt it could open up so many collaborative tools for my students.

We are a Title I public school in Rhode Island and each student K-12 has his or her own Chromebook. My students are very familiar with different Google applications, but I was looking for something I could use in place of a science notebook. I was introduced to Seesaw by a colleague and decided to give it a try.

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[Archive] #TchLIVE: Tech Tools For Teachers

What A Great Chat!

Thank you to everyone who joined us as we discussed technology tools for teachers.

Choose a tool you discovered in the chat and use your downtime to learn and explore over the next few months. If you have questions, reach out. And remember to follow the Tchers you connected with in the chat so we can continue the conversation and get better together!

#TchLIVE Reminder

Want timely reminders about #TchLIVE chats on Twitter? Sign up for our Remind class: remind.com/join/tchlive.

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#TchLIVE: Tech Tools For Teachers

Teaching is an art. And as part of mastering that art, we put in much effort to improveĀ our instruction and meet the needs of our students. Fortunately, with technology we’re now able to explore exciting new possibilities when it comes to enhancing and expanding instruction.

Technology at its best promotes innovation and allows us to add to our already-long library of strategies for differentiation. Technology — used well — allows us to be more creative, adding more colors to our instructional paint palette. Part of the issue, though, is knowing what to use, how to use it, and for what purpose.

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Who’s Having More Fun Here?

It’s a dreary, rainy, Seattle Monday morning, but the spinning disco ball in our room is casting snowball light spots around the room and the lasers are putting on their show. It’s barely 8:45 am and our room is abuzz with activity. School doesn’t start for another 20 minutes, but my students are already diving deep into their work.

Like a whirlwind, Nafiso comes bouncing into our classroom and makes a beeline straight for me. Before I can even open my mouth, her elated screams fill the void.

“Mr. Ewing, Mr. Ewing! They were talking about Andy Warhol on the radio this morning. All about some painting that these people are fighting over!” Nafiso has a big grin on her face. She is so excited to talk art with me.

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