Question Detail

Defending against anti - Common Core propaganda.

Apr 3, 2016 11:28pm

I am a retired math teacher substituting in three local school districts. I have seen blogs and videos attempting to discredit Common Core math. They typically show an elementary exercise designed to teach numeration and an understanding of number relationships but are portrayed as unwieldy ways to subtract. One example starts with the traditional subtraction algorithm 12 from 32. See link below

http://www.infowars.com/you-wont-believe-the-method-that-common-core-is-using-to-teach-our-kids-subtraction/

I have met plenty of adults who say "I never really understood math" or "I'm no good at math" or "Math was my weakest subject", I can see how easy it is for memes such as the link above to turn them against Common Core math.
My question is: How can we defend against the obfuscation of the goals of Common Core by people who see Common Core as a threat and want to go back to the "good old traditional ways" (which often didn't work and are one of the reasons for Common Core standards in math)?

  • Math
  • 2
  • Common Core

1

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    • Apr 10, 2016 11:58pm

      First, I think the position is based on misunderstanding and fear of an unknown. My first question is do you know the person posting it? If you come across some random posting by someone you don't know... I tend to disengage. However, when a "friend" of mine posts, I reach out to them and offer to sit down, face to face, to see if we can have a conversation about our different perspectives.

      Second, I think in reactionary mode, we have little power in the conversation. As such, I would encourage you to post positive "common core" work that shows the amazing thinking in your classroom, for your non teacher friends to see. Imagine if those started going viral.

      I honor that it is a real challenge and I think a positive public relations campaign is much needed. Let me know if you have ideas on how we (at Teaching Channel) might support and lead this campaign.