Question Detail

How do you get students to respect the opportunity for reassessment?

Dec 2, 2014 9:56am

Often students will turn in a test with little or no answers. They will write at the top, "I didn't study. I want to reassess." I believe in the value of reassessments, but not when they are abused. What are some things I can do to still offer reassessments but not have kids abuse the system?

  • English Language Arts / Math / Science / Social Studies / Other
  • 6-12
  • Assessment / Behavior

4

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    • Dec 10, 2014 9:21am

      I agree with Jasmine. The students have to demonstrate they will work for the opportunity to be reassessed. That may mean reteaching with you during an off period or completing a study guide before the re assessment. Also, you can make-I did not study an excuse you will no longer take and request that their answers be content and/or process driven. Conduct a looks like/sounds like exercise with them and model what good answers to the questions look like. Good Luck!

      • Dec 8, 2014 7:01pm

        Also in a re-assessment, perhaps students cannot receive full credit, so they are motivated to try harder the first time around. Also, if they gave to explain the mistakes they made as well as correct them then it makes them work a little harder to get credit back.

        • May 14, 2016 12:20pm

          I also like Jasmine's suggestion, however, I would not want you the teacher to be spending extra time reteaching students who feel entitled to this reteaching, and so perhaps do not even put in effort in the regular class. I think they need to be held accountable for their level of effort.

          • May 14, 2016 10:20am

            I also like Jasmine's suggestion, however, I would not want you the teacher to be spending extra time reteaching students who feel entitled to this reteaching, and so perhaps do not even put in effort in the regular class. I think they need to be held accountable for their level of effort.