Attention Getting Games
Lesson Objective: Facilitate smooth transitions
Pre-K / All Subjects / Transitions

Thought starters

  1. How does Ms. Jaboneta engage students during transitions?
  2. What strategies can you learn from Ms. Jaboneta?
  3. Why is it important to use a variety of games?
16 Comments
Great ideas. Using songs and small physical tasks work so well for the younger kids! I love the whispering song with the box and how she used that to introduce her next subject.
Recommended (2)
Learning without feeling that I am learning. the way of teaching is appreciable.
Recommended (1)
Learning without feeling that the child is learning. The way of teaching is appreciable.
Recommended (0)
Great ideas! I like seeing the level of engagement from the children. I teach K and this would be wonderful to use with them. Thank you.
Recommended (0)
Ms. Christian had a great thought that using songs and the whispering song for grabbing attention and transitioning are best practices for preschool teachers.
Recommended (0)

Transcripts

  • Attention Getting Games Transcript

    Interviewee: Before we have our meeting, let's play a quick game to help you get focused. Are

    Attention Getting Games Transcript

    Interviewee: Before we have our meeting, let's play a quick game to help you get focused. Are you ready?

    Open, shut them. Open, shut them. Give a little clap, clap, clap.

    At this age, five-year-olds, sometimes they're so involved in their play or in their work that when it's time to move on to a transition, it's hard to get their attention. Something we notice works well is games, rhymes, songs.

    Everybody have a seat on a pillow. Not on the ceiling. Not on the armadillo.

    In keeping it fresh, sometimes they'll help and they'll make a suggestion.

    Female Voice: Chair and--

    Interviewee: You read my mind, Cora. I was about to say that. Okay, ready? Chair and bear. Here we go. Everybody have a seat, have a seat, have a seat. Everybody have a seat on a chair. Not on the ceiling. Not on the bear. Everybody have a seat [fading voice 01:09].

    It just makes it a fun way to get their attention.

    So before we go, get your bubble wand that I hid under you. It's invisible. Go ahead and get it. How old are all of you now?

    Male Voice: Five.

    Female Voice: Five.

    Interviewee: Okay, blow five big bubbles. Are you ready?

    I think it's a way to avoid saying, “Okay, everybody stop and listen,” which usually doesn't work. It's a way to use something fun and engaging for the children to participate in and join the teacher, rather than just giving an instruction.

    You ready for our busy box song?

    Female Voice: Yes.

    Interviewee: Do you think we can whisper it?

    Playing guessing games works really well.

    What's in my busy box? Oh, what's in my busy box? Oh, what could it be? Just wait and you'll see. Oh, what's in my busy box? I'm gonna take a peek and see what it is. Hm, it's not what I thought it was. Was the noise light, you think? Was it loud? Was it hard?

    Female Voice: Loud.

    Male Voice: Hard.

    Interviewee: Are you ready to see what it was? It was our book. Remember how we used this book yesterday with—

    It just works to just get all the children focused and on the same page.

    [End of Audio]

Teachers

Nadia Jaboneta

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