Emotional Check-ins
Lesson Objective: Identify and share feelings
Pre-K / All Subjects / Routine

Thought starters

  1. How does this strategy benefit both students and teachers?
  2. Why is it helpful for students to visually see each others' emotions?
  3. How does using this strategy affect class culture?
10 Comments

This is fantastic and honestly should be used with older kids too. I think attending to the social -emotional is just as (if not more) important than academics. And I believe that the teacher should also  have a little stick or way to "check in'' too so that students could see it's OK to feel sad in the beginning of the day and then happy at the end. And if you find that students are constantly putting themselves in one emotion because they are feeling it all the time, it provides information about the students and you can go from there. "Hey I noticed you're always angry, what's going on?"

I teach older kids so I could see it being very beneficial for them in this way.

 

 

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Melinda, I agree - I too love the idea of emotional checkins! Often our students don't have the vocabulary to articulate how they are feeling nor have they made the correlation between deep feelings and their actions. Teaching them how to check-in has potential to provide both. It's never too young. This is a great activity. Provides opportunity for multiple check-ins throughout the day.
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It is an interesting way to gather some information form your students which can be helpful for their profiling
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It is an interesting way to gather some information form your students which can be helpful for their profiling
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This is perfect for a PD I am in right now. I plan to share! Thanks!
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Transcripts

  • Emotional Check-ins Transcript

    [0:00]

    Interviewee: How do you feel?

    Male Voice 1: I feel happy.

    Interviewee: Oh, I'm so glad. Are you proud?

    Male Voice 2: Yeah.

    Interviewee: Do you

    Emotional Check-ins Transcript

    [0:00]

    Interviewee: How do you feel?

    Male Voice 1: I feel happy.

    Interviewee: Oh, I'm so glad. Are you proud?

    Male Voice 2: Yeah.

    Interviewee: Do you feel proud? What do you feel proud about?

    How are you gonna make your face look?

    Male Voice 3: Happy.

    Interviewee: Happy. Angry. Scary.

    A typical morning, kids will come in. We encourage them to do an emotional check-in as a way of helping them identify their own emotions and other people's emotions. They come in and they choose their own picture and they place it in a jar that reflects what they might be feeling.

    What did you—

    Female Voice: Sad.

    Interviewee: You're sad? Why are you sad?

    Female Voice: Because I want my monkey.

    Interviewee: Oh, you miss your monkey? Why don't you go give your monkey a hug?

    For many kids, when it's new, they don't always recognize the difference between maybe happy and excited or scared and angry. This is a way of helping them identify that emotion in themselves and also being able to visually see it in other people, as well.

    That's Andres right there. What does Andres feel like?

    Male Voice 4: He's sad.

    Interviewee: Sad. Andres was feeling sad.

    I try to encourage them throughout the day to, oh, this morning you were feeling sad. I see you, but you don't look sad anymore. Maybe you'd—and they'll tell me how they're feeling. Oh, go move your picture.

    Which one looks like how you feel? Which one do you choose? You can always change it later. You don't have to leave it there.

    It's nice cuz it's concrete for them. It gives them a sense of satisfaction and a way of identifying this is how I'm feeling right now. Kids that are older, I've seen, have been doing it for a while, will do this independently

    [End of Audio]

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Jennifer Hawkins

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