Series: Five Essential Practices for the Teaching of ELLs - Elementary

ELA.SL.K.1a

Common core State Standards

  • ELA:  English Language Arts
  • SL:  Speaking and Listening Standards K-5
  • K:  Kindergarten
  • 1a: 

    Participate in collaborative conversations with
    diverse partners about kindergarten topics and
    texts with peers and adults in small and larger
    groups.

    a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g.,
    listening to others and taking turns speaking
    about the topics and texts under discussion).


    b. Continue a conversation through multiple
    exchanges.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

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ELA.SL.K.1b

Common core State Standards

  • ELA:  English Language Arts
  • SL:  Speaking and Listening Standards K-5
  • K:  Kindergarten
  • 1b: 

    Participate in collaborative conversations with
    diverse partners about kindergarten topics and
    texts with peers and adults in small and larger
    groups.

    a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g.,
    listening to others and taking turns speaking
    about the topics and texts under discussion).

    b. Continue a conversation through multiple
    exchanges.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

Fact or Opinion: An Integrated ELD Lesson
Lesson Objective: Distinguish between facts and opinions
Grade K / Social Studies / ELL
ELA.SL.K.1a | ELA.SL.K.1b

Thought starters

  1. How does this lesson provide varied opportunities for students to use both discipline specific and general academic language?
  2. What supports does Ms. Iwaszewicz offer her students in order for them to have successful academic conversations?
  3. How does Ms. Iwaszewicz strategically use partners?
10 Comments
Thank you for sharing! I learned so much from watching your video. I love how your students were able to do high level thinking and engage in rich conversations.
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Good English language development also helps ELL's learning academic language at an early age
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it is great thanks for that
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Ms. Iwaszewicz models how the conversation should flow between partners A and B before having the children participate themselves. She even had a student team modeling the conversation for the rest of the class to confirm clarity or misconceptions. Excellent strategy.
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I don't know about the rest of the teachers, but this type of teaching must take place. We have people believing in things that are not facts , don't know what a fact is and think they can state opinions as facts, oh lets not forget change facts into what ever they wish as long as it lines up with their opinions. I teach science and we cover this all the time and it's getting difficult to teach with all the stuff going on. Like with any subject it helps to have a base vocabulary to work from and you can see this teacher starts to build a vocabulary that gives the kids the tools they will need. We gave a test one time to adult to identify 10 statements as fact or opinions and the scores were not good. I gave that test 10 years ago and with the explosion of the internet and information it has been eye opening to say the least. We focus a lot of time on measurable facts and numbers. We are always asking can you "count that" " count this " and on and on. With the higher grade students I try to find topics that are close to opinions and test the students, the discussions get very interesting and usually bring out more and more opinions and much more facts to dig up. We are always saying prove it, as an example of opinions that turn into facts but not without proof. One of the key concepts is the idea of a fact and what they are, this gets us into a discussion all the time, and can get very heated. We bring up the idea if 100 people think something about something it is a fact because those 100 people believe it is true. We use this all the time," science doesn't care what you think it care what you know." The most important point that is brought out by this clip is that teaching facts and opinions is important at the earliest ages.
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Transcripts

  • Fact or Opinion: An Integrated ELD Lesson Transcript

    Elizabeth: This morning, we're going to be working on facts and opinions.

    My name

    Fact or Opinion: An Integrated ELD Lesson Transcript

    Elizabeth: This morning, we're going to be working on facts and opinions.

    My name is Elizabeth [Evasheivich 00:00:13]. I'm a kindergarten teacher at Lafayette Elementary, San Francisco Unified School District.

    Let me think, fact or opinion?

    Kid: Do it's a fact or opinion?

    Elizabeth: Today in my class, we're going to be learning the difference between fact and opinion and tying that into our social studies unit, which is about American symbols.

    Face your partner. Now it's his turn.

    San Francisco Unified encourages their teachers to utilize five essential practices when planning their ELD instruction time for their students. My integrated ELD time is really focused on academic conversation, really developing that academic discourse and rigor with my kindergartners, so it's done through structure questions, sentence starters, and partner work.

    Kid: Do you think it's a fact or opinion?

    Kid: I think it is a fact.

    Kid: What makes you say that?

    Elizabeth: Good job.

    Since there are so many ELLs in my room, I strategically pair them up with English speakers so that they're always getting that support that they need, not only from the classroom teacher but from their peers as well.

    I like the color pink. Raise your hand, do you think that's a fact or an opinion? [weda 00:01:39], why do you think that's an opinion? Can that change, or will that not change?

    Kid: That can change.

    Elizabeth: That can change. Tomorrow I may like purple.

    The goal of my integrated ELD lesson was really to reinforce what's a fact and what's an opinion. The reason I did that is because in their next lesson I wanted to make sure when they were creating their own poster charts they weren't putting down opinions, but they were writing facts on that chart.

    Before we work with our partners, what do we have to remember how to do?

    Multiple Kids: Ears are listening. Brain is thinking.

    Elizabeth: We start always our lessons with reviewing the norms of the listening skills, the talk moves, just to refresh their memories.

    Multiple Kids: Keep the conversation going.

    Elizabeth: Good job girls and boys. All right, this morning I'm going to show one of these examples myself. When I say, "This flower is pretty," partner A is going to say, "Do you think it's a fact or opinion?" Partner B is going to say, "Let me think. I think this is an opinion." Partner A is going to say, "What makes you say that?" Partner B is going to say, "I know" and I'm going to look over here "I know that an opinion is a thought or a feeling, and I know that opinions can change."

    I use those language supports in order for them to really ... If they blank and they don't know what to say, they can always refer to the chart.

    How about [wena 00:03:16] and [kada 00:03:17]? Do you want to come up and show us how to do one?

    Having an academic conversation in kindergarten is hard work, but by breaking it down and giving them the tools, they're able to do it. It's been very rewarding.

    [wena 00:03:31], why don't you be partner A?

    Kid: Do you think it's a fact or opinion?

    Kid: I think it's a fact.

    Kid: What makes you say that?

    Elizabeth: Good job.

    Kid: I know that opinions are thoughts or feelings, and I know that opinions do change.

    Elizabeth: [wena 00:04:00], what did [wena 00:04:01] say?

    Kid: [wena 00:04:03] said, "Do you think it's a fact or opinion?"

    Elizabeth: The Washington Memorial is located in Washington, DC. Let's look at our chart again. Let's look at our chart [kana 00:04:16]. Can we observe that? Can we find it in a book? What do you think?

    Kid: It's a fact.

    Elizabeth: Tell her again.

    Kid: I think it's a fact.

    Elizabeth: Why?

    Kid: I know that facts can be observed and-

    Elizabeth: Look at your chart.

    Kid: ... And be in a book.

    Elizabeth: That's good. Now you're going to be partner A this time.

    Today we're moving toward 80% student talk, 20% teacher talk, so a lot of the time, I'm really not speaking in the classroom. They're leading the class, they're doing investigations, and they're sharing with each other.

    Ready for our first one?

    Multiple Kids: Yeah.

    Elizabeth: Don't worry. Oh, here's my statement. I like the white house. Lights, camera, go.

    Kid: Do you think it's a fact or opinion.

    Kid: I think it's an opinion because opinion can change.

    Kid: What makes you say that?

    Kid: It's a thought and a feeling.

    Elizabeth: I heard some really good sharing. I heard a few different answers. Do you remember what your partner said?

    Multiple Kids: Yes.

    Elizabeth: Here's the tricky part. Now you need to switch to your second set partner.

    In today's lesson, I used second set partners.

    Use your rug partner's name this time.

    They need to turn to their second set partner, and tell the second set partner what their rug partner had just shared.

    Kid: It's an opinion because it's a feeling, and opinions can change.

    Kid: [adia 00:06:09] said that it's a opinion because it's a feeling, and she knows that opinions can change.

    Elizabeth: Bump-buh-duh-bump-bump

    Kid: Bump-bump.

    Elizabeth: Last one, I have nothing written there. It's a surprise.

    I always like to throw in a little curve ball at the end of the lesson. It's an assessment piece but also it's just more of a deeper thinking piece.

    This time with your rug partner, I want you to come up with one fact and one opinion. Do you remember who this was?

    Multiple Kids: Yeah. Abraham Lincoln.

    Elizabeth: Abraham Lincoln. Okay, one fact, one opinion.

    That was hard for some students, and that's okay. That's why I love teaching because children make mistakes, and that's how we learn.

    Kid: What's a fact. [crosstalk 00:07:07]

    Kid: Opinion is a thought or a feeling.

    Kid: Oh, one opinion and one fact. [crosstalk 00:07:19]

    Kid: The president is on the $5.

    Elizabeth: All right, let's go. Lights, second set, camera.

    Kid: [aigea 00:07:39] said that it's a opinion because he [inaudible 00:07:45].

    Elizabeth: Fact versus opinion is really tough, and I notice a lot of children today were looking at the chart and literally reading right off the chart and not processing what they were saying as carefully. For that reason, I really think that my next followup lesson has to be something that's even easier than a national symbol. It has to be something that's more personal to them.

    I want to just go back really quickly and see which ones we got.

    We use academic conversation throughout the whole day. We do it when we talk about feelings or we talk about social studies, science. It's wonderful in solving problems and how you got to an answer.

    Audria, why do you think this is an opinion?

    Kid: Because it's a thought.

    Elizabeth: Because it's a thought. It's something I'm feeling, right?

    A lot of teachers would say that academic discourse is a middle or high school topic. I would say start in kindergarten, start frequently, and start in small increments, little steps, baby steps.

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School Details

Lafayette Elementary School
4545 Anza Street
San Francisco CA 94121
Population: 543

Data Provided By:

greatschools

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