Math.Practice.MP3

Common core State Standards

  • Math:  Math
  • Practice:  Mathematical Practice Standards
  • MP3:  Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

    Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and--if there is a flaw in an argument--explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

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Math.K.MD.A.1

Common core State Standards

  • Math:  Math
  • K:  Kindergarten
  • MD:  Measurement & Data
  • A:  Describe and compare measurable attributes
  • 1: 
    Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight. Describe several measurable attributes of a single object.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

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Math.K.MD.A.2

Common core State Standards

  • Math:  Math
  • K:  Kindergarten
  • MD:  Measurement & Data
  • A:  Describe and compare measurable attributes
  • 2: 
    Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has \"more of\"/\"less of\" the attribute, and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as taller/shorter.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

Same or Different?
Lesson Objective: Construct arguments when comparing objects
Grade K / Math / Argumentation
Math.Practice.MP3 | Math.K.MD.A.1 | Math.K.MD.A.2

Thought starters

  1. Why does Ms. Oleston start by having students share what they notice?
  2. How does this activity give students an opportunity to practice constructing arguments?
  3. Why does Ms. Oleston use the "I think... because..." sentence stem?
11 Comments
Loved seeing another classroom talking about the same/different concept. Also noticed these students using left and right correctly in describing what direction to look. Pretty awesome!!
Recommended (0)
I love the use of carpet talks for math here to facilitate both math and language skills. There are so many embedded math concepts here for students to explore, and the students are becoming adept at explaining their thinking and constructing and defending arguments. The practice of coming up with an argument and verbally/visually checking their thinking to demonstrate it to others will help support their ability to think critically. It's also clear that the math instruction in this class has been carefully designed to support the development of these critical thinking and language-based skills.
Recommended (0)
I really like the way students had to justify their thinking. I loved that the one student noticed that there were six white spots in both pictures.
Recommended (0)
it was a great class and I learned how to create a good development class kids little kids
Recommended (0)
it was a great class and I learned how to create a good development class kids little kids
Recommended (0)

Transcripts

  • Same or Different Transcript

    Student: Since 2 yellows off the top, there's 2 yellows on the bottom.

    Speaker 1: The activity "the

    Same or Different Transcript

    Student: Since 2 yellows off the top, there's 2 yellows on the bottom.

    Speaker 1: The activity "the same and different" is getting the students to think about these are two different pictures, but they're related.

    Teacher: I want you to think about what you see, what you notice and then I want you to turn and talk to your partner. What do you notice, what do you see? Okay, turn and talk to a partner.

    Speaker 1: In this activity, we start off with just thinking about what do you notice, what do you see? You have to process what's right in front of you before you can really start thinking about what's the same and what's different. I just want them to notice.

    Alice: There's 4 and 4.

    Teacher: Alice said there's four and four. If you agree with that we can give her a "me too." What else? Does anyone else want to add on to that or have a different idea? What you notice?

    Student: There's 4 yellows and then 4 greens. 4 plus 4 equals eight.

    Teacher: Yes.

    Speaker 1: Then we talk about "what's the same?" What do you see that is the same in both? Then well what do you see that's different?

    Teacher: Are they the same or are they different? If you think they're different, I want you to think of a reason why they're different because these are separate pictures.

    Student: There's a square on the top and there's a line that goes down on the bottom and there's a line that goes through the right on the bottom.

    Teacher: Would that make them the same or different?

    Student: Different?

    Teacher: Different.

    Student: Do a yellow on the bottom. Then 2 green ones at the top.

    Teacher: So would that make them different or the same?

    Student: Different.

    Teacher: Different.

    Tamaz: Both of them have 6 white spaces.

    Teacher: Tamaz is going to say it one more time so that I can then point at it so we can all see it.

    Tamaz: Both of them have 6 white spaces.

    Teacher: We're going to count.

    Class: 1,2,3,4,5,6.

    Teacher: OK, check. Let's do the one on top.

    Class: 1,2,3,4,5,6.

    Speaker 1: When we first started doing the "I Think Because", the answer pretty much across the board was well "my brain told me" which well- that's not really giving me a reason because our brain is always working and telling us things. I had to back up a little bit and really work with them on what it means to explain your thinking or your reason why, what does that mean.

    Teacher: Kamora.

    Kamora: There was 2 yellows on the bottom and 2 greens on the top and 2 on the top and 2 greens on the bottom.

    Teacher: Very good and that's the way they are the same.

    Speaker 1: I think the students have made progress in really getting at a higher level at what is the same and what is different. For instance, there was a student that noticed that while the tiles in each 10 frame were set up differently, there was the same amount of white space. A month or so ago, they would've noticed primarily the colors.

    Teacher: I want to thank you friends for your math brain, using your math brain today and your thinking. Because you been listening to other peoples ideas, you've been using your own thinking, and then explaining why something is the same or different and giving your brains a little bit of a workout.

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Donella Oleston

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