Series: Success at the Core: Authentic Assessment

Math.Practice.MP3

Common core State Standards

  • Math:  Math
  • Practice:  Mathematical Practice Standards
  • MP3:  Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

    Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and--if there is a flaw in an argument--explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

Student-to-Student Assessment
Lesson Objective: Work in small groups to review, revise, and reflect on homework
Grade 7 / Math / Assessment
Math.Practice.MP3

Thought starters

  1. How does the teacher structure homework review to build students' understanding?
  2. What do students learn from reviewing their work and that of their peers?
  3. How does the teacher benefit from students reviewing their homework in small groups?
52 Comments
-How does the teacher use homework as an active assessment in class? The teacher uses homework as active assessment by having students works in groups. Students had to describe what they didn't understand from the previous night's homework. Then, students explained how they got their answer, the reflected on how they did, they also had physical movements. -What are the benefits of utilizing this strategy in small groups? Students can be more active in their learning, they have to participate because they have to contribute in their group in order for the group to be successful. If the groups were larger each student would have less responsibility. -Could you do this in your classroom? Why or why not? I could do this when they are completing homework focused on grammar or sentence structures. I could do this to review a read to write to help show students find evidence and put in their writting.
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1) How does the teacher use homework as an active assessment in class? She is definitely allowing students to reflect on their work and reflect on how well they did it, explain their thinking to peers, and learn other strategies. It does allow for a deeper understanding of the homework. 2) What are the benefits of utilizing this strategy in small groups? I think doing this in small group is important because more students will be able to actively participate. Some students may be more likely or feel more comfortable sharing in small group. 3) Could you do this in your classroom? Why or why not? There is so much curriculum that I am trying to get to and not enough time with my entire class. I could see doing this perhaps in small group when too many students are out of the room to teach a new concept. It would be better for the kids to have a deeper understanding of these concepts.
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How does the teacher use homework as an active assessment in class? The teacher uses homework as an active assessment in class by working in small groups to review, revise, and reflect on their homework. The teacher expects the students to not provide “shallow advice” but advice that is thoughtful and helpful to the table groups. The teacher wants the students to communicate their thinking, and encourage the students to talk and listen to one another. The students are also expected to pass their papers to one another to see the written sample as well. What are the benefits of utilizing this strategy in small groups? The benefits of utilizing this strategy in small groups allows the students to focus on what a student may be struggling with and what strategies the students in the group used to answer a particular question/problem. This also frees up the teacher to walk around to each group and check in, whereas checking work with the entire class. Could you do this in your classroom? Why or why not? Yes, I this a great way for students to get involved with their learning because students be able to hear/ask from their classmates, rather than just the teacher.
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How does the teacher use homework as an active assessment in class? The teacher's goal is to have students communicate their thinking with one another and to verbally communicate their ideas. It allows the teacher to listen to what is being discussed and to have a better idea of the students' weaknesses. What are the benefits of utilizing this strategy in small groups? The students are able to gain more confidence in smaller groups. Could you do this in your classroom? Why or why not? I often focus on small group conversations to promote turn taking and asking questions.
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This teacher uses homework assessment that the students discuss the problems in order t o gain the correct answers. I think that the small groups help the students stay focused. I could use small groups to discuss answer questions and I the kids might have a little fun.
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School Details

Wilson Middle School
902 South 44th Avenue
Yakima WA 98908
Population: 818

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Barbara Cleveland

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