ELA.RL.8.4

Common core State Standards

  • ELA:  English Language Arts
  • RL:  Reading Standards for Literature 6รข\x80\x9312
  • 8:  8th Grade
  • 4: 
    Determine the meaning of words and phrases
    as they are used in a text, including figurative
    and connotative meanings; analyze the impact
    of specific word choices on meaning and tone,
    including analogies or allusions to other texts.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

Approaches to Poetry: Pre-Reading Strategies
Lesson Objective: Students analyze words of a poem before seeing the big picture
Grades 6-12 / ELA / Tone & Theme
ELA.RL.8.4

Thought starters

  1. See how isolating key words prior to reading the poem help students explore themes and make predictions How do the "spotting patterns" and "jumbled lines" tasks engage students in deep analysis?
  2. How does this approach make a complex poem easier to grasp?
31 Comments

This is the most innovative and engaging approach to poetry that I have ever seen. Not only will I use this with my students, I look forward to trying similar exercises for my own work with poetry. It's exciting to actually look forward to analyzing poems! Thank you so much for sharing.

Recommended (1)

I have used games to make words out of words, but this is so much better.  I look forward to using this with students, in the future.

Recommended (1)
She was able to combine several teaching philosophies into one lesson while keeping students motivated and actively participating in the lesson
Recommended (1)
This is brilliant! The teachers energy and approach is inspiring!
Recommended (1)
Great way to teach poetry.
Recommended (0)

Transcripts

  • Summary

    Year 10 English pupils explore William Blake's poem, London, in an usual and innovative way. Suitable for Key Stage 4

    Summary

    Year 10 English pupils explore William Blake's poem, London, in an usual and innovative way. Suitable for Key Stage 4 exam preparation.
    Lead teacher in English and ICT, Carol Weale at Dane Court Grammar School, doesn't give her Year 10 class William Blake's complete London poem but places the words in alphabetical order.
    By isolating key words, the students begin to explore the themes. Carol then presents them with completed lines of London but in a jumbled order. They must rearrange them, using their knowledge of the poems rhyme structure and themes.
    Finally, students compete to memorize and write down as many words from the poem as possible, in a few minutes.
    This largely independent lesson is a great way to encourage and engage reluctant learners and help them to prepare them, for the unseen poetry paper.

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