Math.2.NBT.A.1a

Common core State Standards

  • Math:  Math
  • 2:  Grade 2
  • NBT:  Number & Operations in Base Ten
  • A:  Understand place value
  • 1a: 
    Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones. Understand the following as special cases:


    a. 100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens -- called a “hundred.\"


    b. The numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and 0 tens and 0 ones).

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

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Math.2.NBT.A.4

Common core State Standards

  • Math:  Math
  • 2:  Grade 2
  • NBT:  Number & Operations in Base Ten
  • A:  Understand place value
  • 4: 
    Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

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Math.2.NBT.B.5

Common core State Standards

  • Math:  Math
  • 2:  Grade 2
  • NBT:  Number & Operations in Base Ten
  • B:  Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract
  • 5: 
    Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

Making Math Fun with Place Value Games
Lesson Objective: Make learning fun and incorporate practice with games
Grade 2 / Math / Place Value
Math.2.NBT.A.1a | Math.2.NBT.A.4 | Math.2.NBT.B.5

Thought starters

  1. How does the repetition in a game allow for practice without redundancy?
  2. Notice the different ways in which game requires students to compare quantities using place value. In what ways does the partner and whole group work help to scaffold learning?
129 Comments

Love this!  Always looking for something new and exciting to engage my students. 

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Love this idea!
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I think this is a great way for students to learn a new math concept in a group setting then branch off to independent practice. The group learning allows students to ask questions to clarify before they try it on their own. As the students try it on their own they are able to struggle, ask for help from peers or the teacher and once they get it themselves they can work alone confidently while having fun. This is a great way for students to practice what they learn right away and be able to clarify before they work on this at home.
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Do you think these game would work for an observation?
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The Trash Can game is terrific. Is there a PDF to print out?
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Transcripts

  • 1:00:00 Great Lesson Ideas –
    Place Value Games [music]
    Lisa, Students STUDENTS:
    One, two, I love you!
    STUDENTS:
    Ten, ten!

    1:00:00 Great Lesson Ideas –
    Place Value Games [music]
    Lisa, Students STUDENTS:
    One, two, I love you!
    STUDENTS:
    Ten, ten!
    LISA:
    Tanner [PH], let’s see what you got. A six! Go back and [INAUDIBLE].
    Lisa (VO) LISA:
    I have games for just about every math concept that I teach. And that’s why when I teach it, I model it, we share it together, and then I give it to them independently.
    LESSON IDEA:
    PLACE
    VALUE
    GAMES LISA:
    Hi, my name’s Lisa Bologna, I teach second grade at Jerabek Elementary School. And today’s lesson is Place Value Games.
    Lisa (VO) LISA:
    Games are a great way to teach students, because it gets them involved, and it gets their competition going and it gets them really thinking about things.
    Lisa, Students LISA:
    So, boys and girls, we’ve been talking about place value in math.
    Lisa (VO) LISA:
    And we talked about what the different parts of a number are. There’s the ones, the tens, and the hundreds, are the numbers that we’re working with right now.
    01:00:51 Lisa, Students LISA:
    How many of these one cubes do we find on a, on this stick right here?
    STUDENT:
    Ten.
    LISA:
    A ten. Ten of them. And how many ten sticks do we find in this flat right here?
    LISA:
    Samantha?
    STUDENT:
    Ten.
    LISA:
    Ten? Hmm.
    Lisa (VO) LISA:
    A lot of them, they need to see that, to see that there are a hundred pieces in that 100 flat. There are 10 one cubes in the ten stick. For them to really get the idea. Once we review place value a little bit, I told them we were going to play a game, which they all love.
    Lisa, Students LISA:
    It’s called the trash can game. Okay. The first thing I’m gonna do is roll the cube. I have to put the number that lands somewhere on the place value model.
    PLACE VALUE MODEL LISA:
    This part right here stands for what?
    STUDENT:
    Hundred.
    LISA:
    The hundreds. This one right here is?
    STUDENTS:
    Tens.
    LISA:
    And this one right here is?
    STUDENTS:
    Ones.
    LISA:
    How many digits are gonna go on this number? Dylan?
    01:01:41 Lisa, Students DYLAN:
    Three?
    LISA:
    Three. But I’m gonna roll the dice four times. And one of those number, whichever one I decide, can go into the trash can. I’m trying to make the number that has the greatest value. Ooh, the first number I rolled was a five. So I think I’m gonna put the five in the hundreds spot. Was that a good choice?
    STUDENTS:
    Yeah.
    LISA:
    Okay. Let’s roll it again and see. A three. Where do you suppose you put the three? I can put it in the tens spot, the ones spot, or throw it away and not use it at all.
    STUDENT:
    In the ones?
    01:02:11 Lisa, Students LISA:
    You want me to put it in the ones?
    STUDENT:
    Yeah.
    LISA:
    Okay, we’ll try that. Let’s put it in the ones. And I’m gonna roll it again. And I got another three. What are you thinking, Michael?
    STUDENT:
    Trash can?
    LISA:
    In the trash can? We’ll give it a try. The last number is a four. Using those four numbers, is that the greatest number I could have come up with?
    Lisa (VO) LISA:
    However, there were times when I could possibly roll the dice and have to put that larger number in the trash can. That’s showing the children the value of the number. And having them realize that the hundreds place means more than, than the ones place.
    Lisa, Students LISA:
    Michael, why’d you do that? Did you not make the biggest number you thought you could?
    STUDENT:
    No.
    LISA:
    Who had something different than 632?
    STUDENT:
    Two hundred thirty six.
    01:02:53 PLACE VALUE MODEL LISA:
    Two hundred thirty six. So you’re going to write 236 right here. So I want you to put your number in and then put 632 on the other side, that was the greatest, and then you’re going to put either a greater-than, a less-than, or an equals-to sign in between those two numbers.
    Lisa (INTV) LISA:
    Children do very well learning from each other. Sometimes better than they do learning from the teacher.
    Lisa (VO) LISA:
    If a child thinks of something and explains it in their words, kids pick that up really easily and it’s real exciting for them.
    Lisa, Students STUDENT:
    That’s a one. I got five, baby.
    LISA:
    One again.
    STUDENT:
    Yes!
    LISA:
    Four hundred fifty five. Yeah.
    LISA:
    We continue playing that for a while and then I introduce another game. I want to teach you one more game. But this one we’re going to play as a group. This one is called 101 and Out.
    01:03:49 101 AND OUT LISA:
    Every time I roll my dice this time, it can be either counting as one cubes or I can make that number represent ten sticks. You would have to roll the dice six times, every one of those rolls had to count.
    Lisa, Students LISA:
    And every time I roll the dice, we’re going to add that number to the number before. But I can’t go over 100. If I go to 101, I lose. I’m out. You ready to play against each other? Okay.
    Lisa (INTV) LISA:
    I played one side of the room against the other side of the room.
    Lisa, Students LISA:
    Michael, come on up and roll for your team.
    STUDENT:
    Three.
    LISA:
    Threes. So talk to your team, what do you want it to do? Three or a 30?
    STUDENTS:
    Thirty.
    LISA:
    Thirty, okay. Evan, your turn.
    STUDENT:
    Five.
    LISA:
    Talk to your team if you want, what do you want it to be?
    01:04:31 Lisa, Students STUDENT:
    It should be a fifty because we can get the closest amount.
    LISA:
    Okay, so what should I make it?
    STUDENT:
    Fifty!
    Lisa (INTV) LISA:
    And the competition set in there. It was a lot of fun.
    Lisa, Students LISA:
    So 5743. Anybody’s game still! Ready?
    STUDENT:
    Two.
    STUDENTS:
    Twenty! Twenty! Twenty!
    LISA:
    Three.
    STUDENTS:
    Thirty, thirty, three!
    LISA:
    Remember, this was roll four. You only have two more rolls after this.
    STUDENTS:
    Thirty, thirty, thirty.
    LISA:
    Thirty. Here we go, Team A, are you watching? A one.
    STUDENTS:
    Ten, ten, ten!
    01:05:13 Lisa, Students STUDENT:
    Ten.
    LISA:
    Ten. So what is 63 plus 10? Let’s see what you got. Ooh, he got a six.
    STUDENTS:
    Ooh!
    LISA:
    Wait, wait, wait. Before Samantha rolls. What are you hoping for, Samantha? A two? Let’s see, see what you get. Five. So 73 plus … Five or 50?
    STUDENTS:
    Five, five!
    LISA:
    Five, and what’s the answer? Seventy-eight. Okay, Tanner. Let’s see. What’s Tanner hoping for?
    STUDENTS:
    Six!
    LISA:
    Roll it, Tanner, let’s see what you got! A six!
    STUDENTS:
    Yeah!
    LISA:
    Go back and talk to your team.
    STUDENTS:
    Six, six, six!
    LISA:
    And what is 93 plus six, Tanner?
    01:06:00 Lisa, Students
    Place Value Games STUDENT:
    Ninety-nine?
    LISA:
    Ninety-nine! Very good! So that game, who was the winner?
    STUDENTS:
    Team B.
    LISA:
    If you learned something today, raise your hand. If you learned something, then guess what? You are definitely a winner. Very good.
    Lisa (VO) LISA:
    They need that chance to see the way it’s supposed to be done first, and then doing it together and separately. It’s just practice, but if you call it a game, they think it’s really cool.
    01:06:27 Students [music]
    01:06:30 With special thanks to Lisa Bologna and the staff and students at Jerabek Elementary School
    CREDITS
    Wingspan Pictures Logo [music]
    01:06:40 Fade to black

School Details

Jerabek Elementary School
10050 Avenida Magnifica
San Diego CA 92131
Population: 665

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Lisa Bologna

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