Selective Highlighting: Reading with a Purpose
Lesson Objective: Identify textual evidence to answer guiding questions
All Grades / ELA / Evidence

Thought starters

  1. How does answering guiding questions help students read with a purpose?
  2. What do you need to consider when writing guiding questions for your students?
  3. How do Ms. Norris' students use the textual evidence that they select?
36 Comments
The use of previewing questions prior to reading a passage is a successful tool when reading text.
Recommended (0)
Setting a purpose is key. Previewing questions is a good strategy.
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Pre-reading the questions is a great way to set the purpose for reading where students will have to present information either in a discussion or in writing.
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I like the term "Selectively highlighting."
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I will try this with my students when teaching art history. Highlighting will help with the purpose of retaining the artists that we are studding.
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Transcripts

  • ECET - Strategies Florida - Dawn Norris
    “Selective Highlighting: Reading with a Purpose”
    Program Transcript

    Dawn Norris:
    So remember, our objective

    ECET - Strategies Florida - Dawn Norris
    “Selective Highlighting: Reading with a Purpose”
    Program Transcript

    Dawn Norris:
    So remember, our objective is, we're highlighting text, we're selectively highlighting, we should be able to use that to justify our answers in our paragraph.

    Norris (Interview):
    Selective highlighting is a tool that not only reading teachers use, but any content area teacher can use it. It sets a common purpose for every student's reading, so that whenever they're reading they're not told to just highlight whatever's important, they actually have a purpose for what they're going to read for that particular moment.

    Norris:
    So as we're reading today, I want you to be looking at questions one through three that's in that research packet. Questions being, what is child labor? So we'll highlight anything that has to do with child labor and what it is.

    Norris (Interview):
    So the questions related back to their end task. And so they knew that when they were reading they weren't just gonna highlight anything. Instead they were gonna look specifically for something that's gonna answer those questions.

    Norris:
    Are there any facts, and details that we might want to highlight? Eric?

    Student:
    They will never go to school, never be allowed to be a child.

    Norris:
    They will never go to school, never be allowed to be a child. Absolutely.

    Norris (Interview):
    I think about, what is the end result that I want from them. Is there going to be a conversation afterwards that they're gonna need, um, specific evidence? Or is there gonna be something later on that they're gonna be writing about that they need that type of specific evidence?

    Norris:
    Oh, that's good. I like your connection there. Your evidence there. It's nice.

    Norris (Interview):
    The goal of selectively highlighting is for students to learn there's a purpose to reading, and it makes them be more critical readers. And they're looking for those factual pieces of information that relates back to their end task.

School Details

Monroe Middle School
4716 West Montgomery Avenue
Tampa FL 33616
Population: 690

Data Provided By:

greatschools

Teachers

Dawn Norris

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Teaching Practice

All Grades / All Subjects / Collaboration

Lesson Idea

Grades 9-12 / ELA / Tch DIY

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Grades 6-8 / Science / Tch DIY

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All Grades / All Subjects / Tch Plus

TCHERS' VOICE

Social Justice & Equity