Podcasting To Personalize Feedback
Lesson Objective: Provide personalized feedback through a podcast
Grades 9-12 / ELA / Feedback

Thought starters

  1. How does recording the feedback make it more personal than written feedback?
  2. In what ways does providing feedback via a podcast make the process more collaborative?
  3. Why do you think students are more likely to listen to recorded feedback than written feedback?
84 Comments
The idea of offering feedback and guidance through a podcast demonstrates the thinking involved in the web 2.0 world. Unique, personalized, and time sensitive. If the teacher considered just feedback without the guidance, it could sharpen the writing process for the student especially if this feedback focuses on the draft prior to the published work. Here teacher and student work together on the critical ideas presented by the student. Great for students who might have extreme difficulty with written expression. Great idea, uniquely presented and simple to implement. A teacher could provide a feedback podcast to a few students at a time rotating who gets the feedback over the course of the marking period. Lightens the expectation on the teacher. I venture to say the addition of guidance (feedback vs. guidance) to the process would take much longer. [Feedback = straight forward information of what is present in the writing or missing. Guidance= teacher correctives, suggestions... what is normally plastered all over the margins of a student's paper.] When both are combined, it is more time consuming but a plus when it comes to having a student see the "floor run red with blood" as she/he looks at the master piece dead on the paper.
Recommended (3)
I absolutely love this idea! Hearing what the writing sounds like as feedback is so critical. It forces the student to revisit their ideas from the audience's perspective. The amount of time this technique saves and the quality of feedback it offers makes it a tool worth trying. I'm definitely trying this one. I'm wondering how the information is shared with students? email?
Recommended (1)
This is a wonderful idea! I have never tried anything even remotely similar to this, nor did I have access to iPods before. Someone please tell me: How do you do this for a class? Lets say that each student has 5 comments. Would you number the first student's comments 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, then the next students' 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 ... and all comments would be available on all iPods in the class? OR would each students be assigned to a different iPod? Ex. Jimmy, you will use iPod #5 for your comment... I hope someone knows what I'm asking!
Recommended (1)
Superb use of technology that students use and respond to. I love how concise this video is. For those of us who have never recorded a podcast, I am just wondering how to save and then share with individual students. Excellent video. Thank you.
Recommended (1)
Sarah, I absolutely loved the idea behind this. Here's my question, though. How do you share a podcast with an individual student after you complete the podcast?
Recommended (0)

Transcripts

  • TC0299_001010
    Teaching Channel
    Transcript of
    Feedback with a Podcast
    Teacher: Sarah Wessling GLI Tip & Trick

    Sometimes when students hand in

    TC0299_001010
    Teaching Channel
    Transcript of
    Feedback with a Podcast
    Teacher: Sarah Wessling GLI Tip & Trick

    Sometimes when students hand in a paper I decide to offer them some personalized feedback by creating individual podcasts for them.

    My preference right now is to read the paper through first, put little anchors, something little key words, and then I pull out my iPod, I put a little recording device in there and I push record and I talk to them.

    Teacher: Comment #1, I really like the title here. I’m actually wondering if maybe just having a colon afterwards and defining this preservation a little bit more might be helpful.

    I’ll offer them suggestions for revision or maybe I’ll read a sentence out loud to them so that they hear what it sounds like to me, and I will then ask them is this what you wanted to sound like.

    Teacher: A rose exits from the ground, the stem gains multiple perspectives, the child that progresses. I don't know if you hear what I hear but I hear the sentences starting very similarly so maybe think about changing the structure of the sentences.

    When I first started teaching I spent all of this time writing on these papers and writing on these papers and I would give them to the students and then the ones who were really wonderful kids but less conscientious would just throw them in the garbage on the way out. And I decided well, I can change how I do this.

    Teacher: Comment #10, preserve a style of thinking that is distinctive. I love your voice here, I love it so much I want it so much earlier.

    This is not a teacher talking to a student. I want them to feel like it’s a writer talking to a writer, a reader talking to a reader, a thinker talking to a thinker.

    Teacher: What if you tried to take out passive voice …

    It takes the same amount of time, the only difference is I can say so much more in 15 minutes than I could ever write. And they listen to it.

    {end}

    ? end of transcript

School Details

Johnston Senior High School
6501 Nw 62nd Ave
Johnston IA 50131
Population: 1541

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greatschools

Teachers

Sarah Brown Wessling
English Language Arts / 10 11 12 / Teacher

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