Series: Guided Reading with Jenna

ELA.RL.5.10

Common core State Standards

  • ELA:  English Language Arts
  • RL:  Reading Standards for Literature K-5
  • 5:  5th Grade
  • 10:  By the end of the year, read and comprehend
    literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry,
    at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity
    band independently and proficiently.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

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ELA.RF.5.4a

Common core State Standards

  • ELA:  English Language Arts
  • RF:  Reading Standards: Foundational Skills (K-5)
  • 5:  5th Grade
  • 4a:  Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to
    support comprehension.

    a. Read on-level text with purpose and
    understanding.


    b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with
    accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on
    successive readings.

    c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word
    recognition and understanding, rereading as
    necessary.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

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ELA.SL.5.1

Common core State Standards

  • ELA:  English Language Arts
  • SL:  Speaking and Listening
  • 5:  5th Grade
  • 1:  Engage effectively in a range of collaborative
    discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacherled)
    with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and
    texts, building on others'\x80\x99 ideas and expressing
    their own clearly.


    a. Come to discussions prepared, having read
    or studied required material; explicitly draw
    on that preparation and other information
    known about the topic to explore ideas under
    discussion.

    b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and
    carry out assigned roles.

    c. Pose and respond to specific questions by
    making comments that contribute to the
    discussion and elaborate on the remarks of
    others.

    d. Review the key ideas expressed and draw
    conclusions in light of information and
    knowledge gained from the discussions.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

Guided Reading with Jenna: Small Group Guided Reading
Lesson Objective: Watch two small group lessons targeted to students' needs (part 4 of 5)
Grade 5 / ELA / Differentiation
ELA.RL.5.10 | ELA.RF.5.4a | ELA.SL.5.1

Thought starters

  1. What are the advantages of meeting with students in small groups?
  2. Notice how Ms. Ogier asks students to back up their opinions with text evidence How does Ms. Ogier differentiate for the second group?
19 Comments
That was great. I hope I could apply this with my 7th grade clowns. Wish me luck
Recommended (0)
I loved it!
Recommended (0)
It was a great lesson! Love it
Recommended (0)
Great basic structure and focus to the lesson. However, I felt the teacher was doing way too much talking. I'm hoping the video was edited in such a way as to make it appear that she was doing that much talking! In a guided reading group the students should be guided not interrogated. Also rather than saying "You're right. Where is the evidence for..." I would say "So you think he's embarrassed about his name? What makes you say that?" "Does anyone else have something to add to that? Do you agree with Student X?" A little more Socratic Method and far fewer pronouncements related to being right. I would also not use a graphic organizer with a predetermined number of event boxes. Kids can create their own organizer that reflects their thinking. They may be able to make a good case for 4 important events. Plus it could lead to a great discussion--Student X indicates 3 important events and Student Y indicates 4 important events...who has the better perspective...or are they saying the same thing but in different terms? Teach the kids the basic graphic organizers and then let them determine what to use, when and then create it themselves. (ie concept map, sequence, cyclical, venn and hierarchical)
Recommended (9)
Marilyn - I love your recommendations. We often want to encourage our strugglers with affirmations, but other students can give those affirmations for us and as an added bonus we can see if everyone is on the same page. I really liked the added scaffolding. This teacher knows her students and what they are capable of. If they were advanced students they would be able to make their own graphic organizers, but struggling readers sometimes need to have the organization already laid out for them. This helps them to organize their thoughts. As a follow up discussion you could ask the students if they had trouble sticking to only three boxes and why. That would lead to a great discussion.
Recommended (4)

Transcripts

  • Classroom Close Up: Guided Reading with Jenna: Small Group Guided Reading
    Jenna Ogier

    [01:00:08.10]
    Narrator: In this Classroom Close-Up segment,

    Classroom Close Up: Guided Reading with Jenna: Small Group Guided Reading
    Jenna Ogier

    [01:00:08.10]
    Narrator: In this Classroom Close-Up segment, we zoom in on fifth grade teacher, Jenna Ogier, as she teaches two Guided Reading groups. The first group is learning to identify the main problem of a chapter, and how to defend assertions with evidence directly from the text.

    Jenna: "So, your assignment was to read Chapter 2, Mark Miller, OK? And, I asked you guys some questions about it. Specifically, we've been working on main problem, right? Identifying problems that we see in a story. So, what is the problem in the chapter, Mark Miller?"

    Student: "Everybody started out a new kid, like...he started out a new kid. And, he told everybody his new name."

    Jenna: "Right. He's the new kid in the classroom, and the teacher, Mrs. Jules, who we've been hearing about, right? We met her in Chapter 1."

    Student: "He told everybody that his name was Mark Miller."

    Jenna: "Yes. She introduces him as "Oh, this is Mark Miller." OK. So, Caira?"

    Student: "I think he didn't want anybody to laugh at his name."

    Jenna: "You're right. He is kind of embarrassed about his real name. What part?"

    Student: "It says 'He couldn't tell Mrs. Jules his real name now.' "

    Jenna: "He couldn't tell Mrs. Jules his real name now. She'd think he was making it up. He's like "Oh, I've waited too long, and now, like, Oh, it's gonna be really hard to fix that mistake." But, what part of the text - let's go back - what part of the text tells us that he's a little embarrassed of his name, Benjamin Nushmut? 'Cause that is kind of a funny sounding name. So where in the text, so hold on, I want you to find the part where he specifically says that he's a little bit embarrassed of his own name. Where in the text does it say that?"

    Student: "It says, um, 'his knees were shaking', and he's kind of embarrassed to tell people that that's his real, that that's his fake name, and Benjamin Nushmut is his real name."

    Jenna: "OK, you're right. So, that's on page 7, when it says that 'his knees were shaking'. That is evidence that he is nervous. Good. I like how Nogil's giving a thumbs up. He's like "Yes, absolutely." Nice job, you guys, identifying the main problem of the chapter. OK? Um, and the next assignment that you have is you are going to be reading Chapter 3 and it's called BeBe's Baby Brother, and I want you, we're still gonna keep on working on the same thing, about identifying what is the main problem. So, remember that we talked about OK, if we're thinking about what the main problem is, there are lots of little problems in the story, but we just want to look at the main one, the most important one, and see if we can identify that. 'Cause good readers, we said, don't need to remember every, single little thing that happens in a story. We just want the most important thing. OK? I love how Raylin's like "I'm ready to go." "

    Narrator: With the next group,

    Jenna: "Next group, please come with all of your things."

    Narrator: Jenna teaches a lesson on sequencing of a chapter.

    Jenna: "OK, we ready? Go ahead. I like how Tylie opened up, showing me that he's ready. Nice! So, last time we were together we were working on sequencing, deciding what the most important parts were in the chapter, right? And, keeping them in order. So, like saying "First, this happened, and then this, and then this, and then this, and then this, and finally this. OK. So, since good readers often have to think about what first happened, what happened in Good Luck Signs?"

    Student: "Sodeko is in a hurry to go to the Peace Day carnival, but her family says that it's not fun and games. It's a sad day."

    Jenna: "Ohh, good. Why is it a sad day? You're absolutely right. Sodeko's so excited to go to this Peace Day carnival, and her dad kind of, gets mad at her, right? Because this is supposed to be a sad day; it's supposed to be a serious day. Why is it a serious day? Peace Day? Why is it serious?"

    Student: "It was serious day because it's probably the thing that was about to happen, about the um, the boomy thing, about that bomb that was gonna drop down, I think. That's probably..."

    Jenna: "The atom bomb?"

    Student: "Yeah, the atom bomb."

    Jenna: "Christian, what did you want to add?"

    Student: "It's a Memorial Day for them because their grandmother died."

    Jenna: "Good job. So let's go to what your assignment was, to see what were the important things that happened. What happens first?"

    Student: "What happens first is that girl meets and plays with her best friend.

    Jenna: "OK. Good. The second thing that happens is they have to walk through a building where they see all these scary pictures of the atom bomb survivors. And, we had said that she didn't like doing that, right? Because she saw pictures of people, maybe who had died, who had gotten burned from the bomb. Joshua, go ahead and put that pencil down, so we're not getting distracted by it. OK? Thank you. Tylie, did you want to add?"

    Student: "Next, Sodeko and her um, friend, Shuzuko, talked about when Sodeko was little and the atom bomb hit. I think they were talking about the atom bomb history."

    Jenna: "You're absolutely right, so the third thing that happens, is that Sodeko, right, is remembering, and then what? Maybe the picture gives us a clue. Christian, what happens next?"

    Student: "They burn candle, they burn candles in front of the, the picture of their grandmother."

    Jenna: "OK, 'cause in Chapter 1 we learned that Obichan, the grandmother, died, yeah, from the atom bomb. OK, go ahead, you can take your things. This assignment is due Monday."

School Details

Aspire Berkley Maynard Academy
6200 San Pablo Avenue
Oakland CA 94608
Population: 566

Data Provided By:

greatschools

Teachers

Jenna Ogier
English Language Arts Math Science Social Studies / 4 5 / Teacher

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Lesson Idea

Grades 9-12, ELA, Class Culture

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