Same or Different?

Grade K / Math / Argumentation
CCSS: Math.K.MD.A.1 Math.K.MD.A.2 Math.Practice.MP3

Common Core State Standards

Math

Math

K

Kindergarten

MD

Measurement & Data

A

Describe and compare measurable attributes

1

Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight. Describe several measurable attributes of a single object.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

Common Core State Standards

Math

Math

K

Kindergarten

MD

Measurement & Data

A

Describe and compare measurable attributes

2

Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has "more of"/"less of" the attribute, and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as taller/shorter.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

Common Core State Standards

Math

Math

Practice

Mathematical Practice Standards

MP3

Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and--if there is a flaw in an argument--explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

In Partnership with

and

Lesson Objective

Construct arguments when comparing objects

Length

4 min

Questions to Consider

  • Why does Ms. Oleston start by having students share what they notice?
  • How does this activity give students an opportunity to practice constructing arguments?
  • Why does Ms. Oleston use the "I think... because..." sentence stem?

Watch all the videos in this series.

Common Core Standards
Math.K.MD.A.1, Math.K.MD.A.2, Math.Practice.MP3

Supporting Materials

  • Please sign in or sign up to download Supporting Materials
  • Same or Different Transcript

Add This to My Workspace in Lesson Planner

   

 

This Has Been Scheduled in Your Lesson Planner

   

 

This Has Been Saved in Your Lesson Planner

   

 

Saved in Your Lesson Planner

   

 

Scheduled in Your Lesson Planner

   

 

License This Tch Video on Your Site

Request more information about licensing

Teaching Channel's videos ​help teachers get better at teaching--no matter where they are in their careers.​ By licensing our videos, your users get unlimited access to these unparalleled tools for a period of one year. To request more information:








License Type
Licensing Users